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the interest of the middle class and the protection of social security, medicare and medicaid for the people who are in such desperate need of those great programs that are the hallmark of our country. we have repeatedly said and our caucus again just confirmed that job creation equals deficit reduction, and we must put the country back to work. we have proposals that are on the floor. we still believe that even with the -- what little time remains and what little time remains when we're actually working, this is still possible. this is still doable. this is not a democrat or republican issue. republicans believe that america needs to go back to work. it's just a matter of having the will to do it, the programs are out there. compromise can be made around the streamlining of regulations to make sure that we are putting people back to work. if chris christy and barack obama can get -- chris cristie and barack obama can get together on that, and i know what's transpired and how the impact of our infrastructure has taken place along the eastern seaboard, it's something we ought to be able to ra
for medicare to 67 and deal with entitlements by extending ages going out into the future, i am all for it. host: an independent caller, what do you think? hostcaller: you look lovely. we appreciate it. i started talking about this in july 2011. the gop -- he said they are in violation of their oath of office whenever they refuse to raise the debt ceiling. then when they do it on the floor, they are in violation of u.s. code. by dissenting that argument in public and then recommending the public and the court their views. host: this proposal by republicans does not include any thing to raise the debt ceiling. caller: i know but they are going to have to do that. also, john boehner -- this proposal has $160 billion less than he offered before the election and also raises the money taken out of medicare and medicaid by $62 billion. how democrats or anybody could except that -- could accept that. the average folks here in america do not want to pay their fair share. they cannot argue the point that everybody has to give a little bit more to help us eliminate some of this debt and keep the cou
calls for deep cuts, environmental protection, social security, medicare, medicaid. well, corporations and the top 1% get tax cuts of nearly $3 trillion over the next decade. this is not how you protect a democracy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. poe: mr. speaker, the -- a president has finally given us his balanced plan to allegedly avoid the fiscal cliff. he wants to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion. he wants another stimulus package of $50 billion. he wants the authority to raise the debt ceiling without asking congress for approval. say it isn't so, mr. speaker. this tax hike will hurt small businesses which provide 67% of the jobs in this country. that may fund the government for a short time. then, what's the plan? stimulus 2.0. because the first stimulus worked so well? that was a disaster as well. we have a $16 trillion deficit, and the president wants to spend m
out for the interests of the middle-class and the protection of social security, medicare, and medicaid for the people who are in such desperate need of those great programs that are the hal. this is not a democrat or republican issue, the republicans need a map -- issue. compromise can be made to make sure we are putting people back to work, that chris christy and barack obama can get together on that. i know this is known firsthand of what is transpired and how the impact of our infrastructure has taken place on the eastern seaboard, it is something we ought to be able to rally around immediately. everyone deserves a $250,000 tax break. we all agree on that. why not just simply adopt it. then come back and we will have time to address the issues as they relate to bending on health care. and focusing on the vast inefficiencies, the fraud, abuse. $750 billion annually. the chairman, from my district, said, it would be a way for us both to bring down the deficit, but also make health care affordable, a sensible, and functional for the american people. something i believe we
are paid. people criticize medicare, but people on medicaid get much better care than the people who are on medicare. i paid over $3,000 for my hearing aid, that came out of my pocket. if i had been on medicaid, that would have been absolutely free. but nobody ever talks about cutting any of that. i think every social program should have a sunset date. and besides, when they talk about cutting, that's never a cut, it's just a decrease in the amount of increase. i really think there's no hope for this country any more. i'm 82 years old, i've lived through a lot. i don't ohno one a penny, because my income is $1,700 a month. i don't spend what i don't have. host: that's dixie in clinton, mississippi. we're going to leave your comments there. speaker boehner held his news conference yesterday and here's a little bit about what he had to say yesterday. >> about raising taxes on the so-called top 2%. half of these taxpayers are small business owners that pay their taxes through their personal income tax filing every year. the goal here is to grow the economy and control spending. you're n
face great challenges, the economy, immigration, the debt, social security and medicare on these items and more we must find the answers soon if we hope to keep our country on a path to prosperity. and those solutions will only materialize if the members of congress take a chance, work together and care more about results than sound bites or the next election. equally important they must, must be willing to take a walk a few hundred feet to the other side of the rotunda. the house and the senate are two sides of the same coin and yet they have never seemed further apart. my proudest moments as a member of congress have all been the result of collaborations. my work to keep homeless kids in school, bar genetic discrimination or reform the nation's flood insurance program were all signed into law after extensive personal conversations with members of the upper chamber. we have great leaders here in the house, but they alone cannot maintain communications between the two greatest deliberative bodies in the world. it's up to all of us, and will be to all of you. so mr. speaker, my advice i
, means testing on taxes? medicare for more affluent recipients, excluding my wife? >> let me just say that we would support a balanced approach, and it is important to point out, as senator warner did, that we have done over $1 trillion in cuts in the next 10 years which the president is committed to keeping. with respect to medicare, we do have a very different approach to dealing with medicare. there is no doubt we have to bring down medicare health-care cost growth. the difference is that we believe we should expand on the kind of reforms that we made in the affordable care act, where we achieved billion about $716 billion in savings, not simply by across the board provider cuts, but by changing the incentive structure, the way we pay providers so we focus on the value of care, not the volume of care. i think it is ironic that we have gone in the last four weeks from many of our republican colleagues criticizing the president for having done too much in savings on medicare, $716 billion -- their presidential candidate proposed putting that money back in, in other words adding $716
. there was no medicare. it has been pretty stable since 1980. it goes up and down with the business cycle, but it is pretty stable. this is the division between the right and left. who will continue to fight about bigger government and smaller government. we will not do it by refusing to pay for the government we have, thinking the economy in the process. that would be a good start, as a backdrop. i want to touch on your question about corporate and individual taxes. the third piece is small businesses. we work out how develop a tax code that is good for competitiveness. you need to think about how those play into it. i think one of the things to keep hearing through messages with different groups of people is, while everybody is aware that the solution is going to take sacrifices from all sides, on spending, on revenues -- the confidence you get for putting the deal in place to actually has tremendous economic benefits. the cheapest form of stimulus is confidence. if we can put that in place, and people believe something is going to stick, it becomes easier to do your part in all of this
, will house democrats provide votes to cut benefits to programs like medicare and medicaid? >> let me say that clearly, as gene sperling was sent today, the president is willing to look at what they're going to put forward in terms of revenues, but that has not been forthcoming, shall we say. with the president has been very clear is in terms of the impact on beneficiaries and beneficiaries are the people who are the recipients of medicaid, medicare, and social security -- we believe at most would agree that social security is not responsible for the deficit and should not be on at the table for discussion. with regard to the so-called entitlements -- i come from hartford, connecticut. this is a matter of insurance and it is a matter of actuarial assumptions. and i think when you look at things in terms of insurance and not entitlements, people were i come from say, wait a minute, i paid for this. that is my insurance that i paid for. now, there are actuarial assumptions you can make -- life span, various elements, wellness, exercise, preventative care. a number of things built into the a
the combination of expectation of the 2001 tax reduction for the top 2% and the extension of the medicare act and capital income. under the president's preferred tax policy, the top rate would go from 35% to 49.9% for ordinary income -- and for ordinary income from 15% to 25%. the long-term consequences of president obama's tax policies would have a profound and negative affect. capital stock would be dollar -- would fall. fewer jobs and lower wages resulting in higher taxes would harm the middle class. data reveals three important facts of high income earners. the taxes on the wealthy raise as much faster than on everyone else during economic booms, but they also fall much faster during economic bust. people bit more income when tax rates are low and not when they are -- report more income when tax rates are low and not when they are high. there are better ways to increase federal revenues than hiking tax rates. congress could enact a program of tax reform that would lower rates and eliminate interest reductions. the president could open up more federal lands and offshore areas for energy ex
for entitlement programs. do democrats support that? >> first of all, we do democrats, saw savings in medicare of over $700 billion and affordable care act. we use that money to strengthen medicare and extend its life for almost a decade and to increase benefits for seniors now. is there more opportunity for that? yes. but not at the expense of an official years. there have been all kinds of -- but not at the expense of beneficiaries. >> st. mary's hospital is a catholic institution in san francisco. should they be required to adjust to this new health plan? >> the compromise is a reasonable one. >> madame leader? >> yes. >> would you support that if it is part of the package? >> i want the middle class to get a break. i would hope we could get the middle income taxes cut. it is important for us not to think that the payroll tax holiday is a substitute for real relief for middle income families in our country. in the absence of other things, which might have to be considered, i had hoped that two years would be enough. unfortunately, republicans in congress have stood in the way of many of the
political adviser indicated that medicare and medicaid are the main drivers of our deficit. i know we have seen this morning also several editorial writers indicate the same, that it is important that we put these drivers of the deficit on the table and include them as part of any agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff. as the speaker said, we have done our part. we have put revenues on the table, something we did not do two years ago during the debt ceiling negotiation. we still believe that it is most important for us to address the economic situation in this country where so many people are out of work. that is why we take the position and believe strongly that increase in marginal rates i, income-tax rates, is not the way to produce growth and put people back to work. but we have not seen any good faith effort on the part of its administration to talk about the real problem that we're trying to fix. i am told mr. bowles, some of us will meet with him later today, said earlier this morning there has been no serious discussion by the white house on entitlements, on medicare and medicaid. th
in medicare but health care but we pay more, more than most countries, and we get less. here's an example of a reform. right now in medicare, when we buy prescription drugs, we buy wholesale but we pay retail and the law requires us to pay retail. whereas in the v.a., in medicaid, we do price discounts when we're purchasing. if we did that in medicare that would save us $160 billion a year. so what i'd like to see is us save money on health care. we need to do that. but it's got to be through system reform. host: can you save enough money through system reform without looking at benefits? guest: you know, you got to start there, because you really don't want to be saying to somebody, we're going to have a system where if we have a broken wrist we'll cover it but if it's a broken forearm we won't. and if we go through legit mate ways to save money, then you get into benefits and ask, how do we pay for it, and we'd either have to adjust that, the payments, or we have to make decisions how to deal with the benefits. but you got to start with where you can actually save money. you know, there
to pay. she paid into medicare many years. i think all seniors need to be aware and be prepared that this is what will happen to them. that's my experience. host: in philadelphia, rick is a democratic caller. caller: i cannot believe i got through. the last time i spoke with c- span was 2003. give me about a minute and 30 seconds. host: go! caller: i think barack obama should keep doing what he is doing, hold his ground. i think it is cold hearted and evil that these rich people don't want to pay what needs to be paid to keep the country running. everybody in the capital -- what is the definition of entitlement? people in the capital get pensions and free health care for not even doing anything, and personal cars and things like that. so do they want to be a country unto themselves, a country of texas or a country of florida? host: running out of time. we only have about 30 minutes for open phones this morning. i will have to let you go. the hottest property to emerge from obama's victory over the running is not the much lauded campaign theme, is something far more valuable that
, more people are out of work. it means that we do not have money to pay for basic benefits like medicare and social security. it is important to talk about deductions and tax policy in terms of tax reform. john boehner opened the door for that. president obama has indicated no intention of looking at that. host: what deductions would you put on the table? guest: tax reform is not to raise revenue. is to make the tax code less of a drag on the economy. we do that by lowering tax rates and getting rid of some deductions, exemptions, credits. but we do not do it to raise revenue. host: chuck marra, how important our deductions? guest: they are very important. if you get into this notion that they are loopholes, then you look at the very popular deductions the people rely on. they're trying to balance the economic weakness with the long-term needs of the economy, which is that we do face a future of deficits that are unsustainable. we are trying to stabilize the debt has a share of our economy over time. that means about $4 trillion in savings. the good news is, last year, the congress and t
there is a big challenge. there are problems with medicare and social security. they are facing big deficit situations. host: what motivates the creation of deductions? what about the other incentives? mortgage deduction it to encourage people to buy a home. guest: some of the deductions have been around forever, since the invention of the income tax. there has always been a deduction for interest that you paid. the government didn't think it could distinguish between mortgage interest and other kinds of interest. less interest is deductible now. some of the things are left over from the early days of the tax code. there is no magic about allowing people to deduct mortgage interest and not the interest they pay on their credit cards. some of these things are hard to explain. host: does it incentivize home buying? guest: it does provide some if incentive for buying a home and is a large tax break and gives them an enormous benefits. it mostly provides an incentive for buying a bigger house. it seems to incentivize mcmansions. there is a fair question of whether that is something we should be
revenues. it did contain four specifics. four. cut medicare specific number one. $600 billion. cut medicaid, pays for nursing homes for seniors, of course. priority number two. three, cut the adequate cola for seniors on social security. even though 40% of seniors depend principally or totally upon social security and the cola already underestimated inflation particularly for medicare, essentials they need. cut that. not a driver of the deficit but, hey, cut that. one more specific. preserve the bush-era tax rates for income over $250,000. it's not a tax increase for everybody who earns over $250,000. it's only the income over $250,000 that would get additional taxes if the bush-era rates went away and the president's proposal was passed. but, no, they want to preserve -- totally preserve tax cuts for income over $250,000. they want to preserve the reduced capital gains rate and dividends rate which principally who ben pets, who else, millionaires and billionaires. now -- benefits, who else, millionaires and billionaires. they did have the jay wellington wimpy plan. you remember him? popeye
and medicare specifically and there was talk about that and we need new revenue. we spent the last year trying to get through to new revenue and borrowed ideas from both sides but we put together a group of people who are quite experienced, bill, larry, les and tony and we really tried to work through how would you raise enough revenue to hit the simpson-boles target. that is $1.8 trillion dollars that is higher than the president and the republican offer. we did that by removing the alternative minimum tax, repealing other provisions that add complexity and eliminating unjustified tax loopholes but we did it by converting the current system of deductions, which favor high income taxpayers through a system of tax credits which equalizes the benefit that middle income as well as high income taxpayers get. we restore the top rate of 39.6%. there is a lot of debate of whether you can lower the rate. our judgment was you needed that rate in order to have a progression of income and it is incumbent on other people to come forward to show how to get the income necessary to deal with our fiscal probl
-- the spending cuts on medicare. why don't we allow them to negotiate medicare and to reduce the cost of medicine? that should save you a lot of money yearly. i agree totally about the republicans and democrats spending money stupidly just before the election. both sides voted to refurbish something like 170 army tanks that the army said they'd do not need. they went and voted to repair those tanks. why are we wasting our money? democrats want to cut taxes. host: armstrong williams? guest: we haven't gotten to affordable care and medicare and medicaid. if affordable care was administered correctly and if he did not have the special interest groups and if tort reform was not included, package you move forward in making health care work for anyone if you do not bring tort reform to the table? the medical malpractice lawsuits are out of control where doctors are paranoid and have to think twice before going through these procedures. it becomes a nightmare for doctors. there are too many hands in the pot. the mentality in washington is that everybody has to get paid so they can be compensated. when a
house is offering? caller: republicans have been against every type of social security, medicare, but all you have to know is that there is no way you can cut your -- way to a balanced budget. host: from maryland, republican line. hello. caller: i watch you every morning. they keep talking about entitlement. why don't we cut some of these entitle appellants to politicians? the state and the federal. it was just in the paper. the state workers are getting a 47 cost of living raise -- a 4% cost of living raise. what about their transportation is paid for, their insurance, their food. their hotels. they get six figures of pay, plus all they do is campaign. obama's in the air again, campaigning in p.a. today. could you imagine what it cost us for him to constantly campaign since 2006? host: so far his proposal has entitlement cuts. $4 billion. what do you think of that as a proposal at least to talk about as the discussion goes forward? >> i say take some from them. host: but what do you think about the cuts to the entitlement programs themselves? >> some need to be cut, granted. bec
the president needs to show the democrats' hand on this. what do you want to do in terms of medicare and how quickly do you want those implemented? >> well, you can look at our budget from the last two years, and there are plenty of specific proposals, most of which were part of the conversation that the president and i had two years ago. or a year and a half ago. there have been discussions about many of those same issues this time. so there's a lot from the conversations that we've had to inform almost anybody the kind of proposals we're looking for. >> even the paul ryan plan on medicare doesn't really take effect for years down the road. do you want something more immediate? >> i think the debt crisis that we face requires us to make serious decisions and it requires us to make those decisions now. thank you. >> eric cantor also talk about the deficit reduction package. if the make it easier for foreign students to stay in the us, the stem jobs that. this is about 10 minutes. >> good afternoon. we just passed the stem's job act. it was a build directly related to trying the economy going
real structural entitlement reform. there is no manner of tax hike that can save medicare or medicaid. these programs can only be fixed with real reforms. some on the left say tinkering around the edges of medicare and medicaid would be enough, or that the health law is in touch and a perform. they argue we do not need to examine the structural problems. make no mistake about it then been shoring up medicare and medicaid will not be easy. the situation has become so severe, it is the only responsible course to take them back in just over a decade medicare will be bankrupt. medicare beneficiaries receive $3 in benefits for every $1 they pay into the system. that is while 10,000 more americans join this program every day. the number of workers supporting it has declined by over 18% over the last decade. the average family could give up its salary for the entire year, sell their house, and still not have enough to pay their share to secure medicare pendent unfortunately, some on the other side of the aisle are advocating a disastrous strategy that would take us over the cliff putting mil
reform. there is no manner of tax hike that can save medicare or medicaid. these programs can only be fixed with real reforms. some on the left say tinkering around the edges of medicare and medicaid would be enough, or that the healthcare law is entitlement reform. they argue we do not need to examine the structural problems. make no mistake about it. shoring up medicare and medicaid will not be easy. the situation has become so severe, it is the only responsible course to take. in just over a decade medicare will be bankrupt. medicare beneficiaries receive $3 in benefits for every $1 they pay into the system. that is while 10,000 more americans join this program every day. the number of workers supporting it has declined by over 18% over the last decade. the average family could give up its salary for the entire year, sell their house, and still not have enough to pay their share to secure medicare. unfortunately, some on the other side of the aisle are advocating a disastrous strategy that would take us over the cliff putting millions of middle-class families, small businesses,
, but these are the things i want to do. you can pass it that way. you can see it in the government with medicare and social security. no one is arguing we have to cut medicare and social security taxes because they see them tied to something very specific. it goes into a trust fund used for their benefit. in the process of this, if you could print this discussion much -- if you could bring this discussion much more fully home -- it is more than just fixing that, and that is a specific use of it, bringing it home to some actual uses of this fund, how are you going to make the social security trust funds solvent over a long period, making it work, you would find resistance to this stuff a great deal less. >> do you think the president has made that connection with the outreach he has done since the election or during the election? >> no, it is still in a class warfare mode on both sides. bringing it home, thinking about what you are going to tell that person wherever you see them about this -- you can take the sting out of this thing by -- there are other people here who have political things that may have r
? and on whom? second, what medicare and other spending cuts would you propose? people propose large numbers and never fill in details. but we have filled in the details with our first step. let them tell in the details of their first step. they have not done either, so it is not much of an author -- an offer. >> they did not include having the top rates go up on the wealthiest americans. their proposal goes right back to that class. charitable deductions, mortgage relief and legislation i have had them place -- in place. there is a whole range of things you have to go through. that is the point. we are not going to do that. we have to make sure that the wealthiest help pay down this large deficit. we have large discussions going on in the senate at various places. we know what the parameters are. the president is ready, willing, and able to sit down and negotiate this. >> the statement, we have done something. we want every tax rate to go up. the interesting part, we agree it should not go up. we disagree on the top 2%. why don't we go where we agree and make sure those folks in the middle
for medicare by extending the cap on medicare. at that time, it had a gap. all of the other taxes in there were primarily related to use or consumption. it met the criteria established by the republicans in the senate and the republicans in the house. we presented that to the committee as a whole. to the participating members of the republicans but dissipating in the process on the house and senate side as a whole. i had a specific conversation with both gramm individually and gingrich individually. it was agreed we had met the criteria. i am not positive of the numbers. i believed it was something like 375 or $380 million in cuts. $125 million in revenue in the first package. roughly three-one. the white house was under the assumption this was acceptable, everybody we had contacted who was part of the process agreed to it. we sat down with the democrats, confirmed to them that we had a deal. tom and george mitchell went back to their much larger gaggle. they had the majorities in the house and senate. finally, the leadership in congress, the democratic leadership, the republican minority leade
mean specifically. he won't tell us. we already did over $700 billion in savings in medicare by stopping overpayments and doing a number of other things that focus on prevention. of course, we are willing to sit down and look at everything within the context of what's good for seniors and people. at this point, if they have line, show us what it is and be specific. we are being very specific. pass the senate bill. >> we have already done $1 trillion of cuts so we are not afraid of taking on the challenge is coming true. they have an opportunity today, right now, to make sure that middle-class america not only texas of our to do less but has a great christmas. and making sure they have a tax cut january 1. we have done $1 trillion and medicare and we have done our position on taxes and we're waiting for the specifics. it is pretty simple. >> will also passed a farm bill on the son of that which was bipartisan which almost -- with almost $24 billion in cuts which they can pass and have additional cuts. >> will there be any deal to raise the tops -- top tax rates? >> we ran an e
and medicare. increasing taxes means less growth and fewer jobs, and that's not balanced. three years ago i made a pledge to oppose tax increases. i made that pledge to the citizens i serve and to no one else, and i made it because tax increases will hurt them. when jen, the owner of la petite cuisine in new york says the best thing i can do is give her a break from high taxes, i believe her. i ran for congress to help jen and all the small business people like her who are the engines of job creation. i ran for congress to help all the people who need employers like jen to hire them. these good people deserve better than temporary fixes. they deserve a plan that solves our economic problems for the long term. they deserve a plan that goes beyond politics and shows a commitment to putting the federal government on a budget and on track to eliminate our crushing debt, that respects our citizens' rights to enjoy the fruits of their labor and to spend and save and invest as they see fit, which is the best way to grow the economy and add jobs and that allows each of them, regardless of their sta
to be cut. he has said to trim medicare, but in a modest way. republicans are trying to protect the very popular high- end bush tax cuts. how do they make that up? they cut mortgage deductions that we've been talking about, and medicare. and they want to cut both of those, but it seems they are afraid to say that. if the republicans do not want to let the high end push tax cuts sunset, how will they make up that money? how much from medicare? how much from the mortgage deduction, a charitable deduction? people deserve to know that. host: here is a tweet. we need a flat tax and stop all the flap in. guest: that would be great. we have a flat tax at the heritage foundation. you can see it at the website. there has been an effort in the last couple of weeks to broaden the negotiation to something bigger than a grand bargain. i think that is largely misplaced. let's focus on the issues that are most pertinent right now, which is the expiring tax cuts. let's focus to what matters by the end of the year. host: thank you both for joining us. >> a bunch of reporters were called into a closed-doo
% earn is going to have a new 3.% medicare tax added to it. 3.8%. 0.9%, mr. speaker, that's an increase in the medicare tax on the earned income of these folks. 3.8% increase on the unearned income, 0.9% increase on the earned income. 2.7%, mr. speaker. that's the medicare tax that that top 1% is already paying on all of their earned income today. it's going to go up another .9. they are already paying 2.7. the president says that's not enough. let me do some quick math here. they are only gg to have to pay one, mr. speaker, either the unearned income tax or earned income tax that would be 3.8% either way. they are paying 39.8, plus this 15.3, of course, on all those dollars that are subject to medicare and social security under the cap today, plus another 6% the average rate for state income tax today. let me add those. my home state of georgia, let me come back over here to these middle class taxpayers that appear to be paying 46.3% as a marginal rate of every dollar they earn. back over here to the high income folks, before they pay their payroll taxes, we have 44.8, and of course on
territory. to be truthful, this assumes that all the federal -- all the social security revenues, medicare revenues are getting spent on other projects rather than going in the trust fund and being preserved. we didn't really have a surplus. we were spending social security and medicare revenues to create a surplus. but we did have some better years then. then we go into the bush years. this is important. 9/11 changed the way this country deals with national security. a lot of programs going on much to my surprise, mr. speaker, you remember, we create add brand new federal department with the republican house, republican senate, and republican president. we created a brand new entitlement program, medicare part d with a republican house and republican president. and we ran during the bush years, and represented right here, we ran at that time what was the largest deficit in american history. the largest deficit in american history were run during the bush administration with republican house, republican president. and we began to get a hold of that. that was after 2001, september 11 again,
ryan the plan on medicare does not take effect four years down the road. do you want it to be more immediate? >> i think the debt crisis we face requires us to make serious decisions and to make those decisions now. thank you. >> eric cantor also spoke about the deficit reduction package at this conference that would make it easier for foreign students to stay in the united states. this is 10 minutes. >> good afternoon. we just passed the stem jobs act. it is related to trying to get the economy going again. we know one of america's strength has been innovation. " we have seen the not only american students, but many foreign nationals have come to this country to be educated in our colleges and universities, specifically in the stem areas. it will allow these individuals to have a green card if they get a diploma. therefore enabling them to stay in this country to begin their careers and not to go to their home countries and compete with us. this is something we strongly believe in. i think it reflects what all of us think about america, we are a country of unlimited opportunity. w
that the government is so corrupt and all in different departments, there's so much fraud going on, like the medicare program, the doctors and the insurance companies have brought the department so bad. they need some cleanup crew, cleanup people to check all the fraud that's going on. i watched american greed on tv and some people ought to watch. that i just watched it the other night, about the skin doctor that was cutting elderly people, special people that's on medicare, and he was -- so many doctors, when that first was passed when president johnson signed the bill into law, it was miss managed once the doctors didn't want it at first. they voted against it and the republican senators, i remember clearly. i -- i'm 85 years old. and i've paid taxes since i've been 15 years old. i've paid into the -- host: social security, medicare. caller: social security, i've paid into that all through my life. host: we appreciate you're watching, we appreciate you're calling. in any comment first of all for that caller? it's a little outside your baileywick. guest: this is a time when people in congress are ta
level -- significant enough level of disability to qualify for medicare, home and community- based service waivers, there is a service provision system that is available for you, but for those of us who may struggle with employment, independent living, and other skills sets, very often, the only option that is made available in disability policy is to go on supplemental security income. that is a very restrictive option. it means that people have to exit the work force and face really significant limitations on both income and assets. people on ssi cannot save more than $2,000. that means it is impossible for them to plan to get ahead economically. when we try to plan to return people to get to the work force, it is very difficult. people often spend 12 or 18 months having to portray themselves in the worst possible way, swear that they cannot work just as a precondition to get some of the support that they need that might assist them in entering the workforce. that is a sad policy. a couple of things we can do about that. first, congress will need to have a conversation reforming
. short of capturing medicare, that we know is off the table. even at mitt romney denied that one. if republicans insist on spending cuts being part of the down payment, the onus is on them to come forward with ideas. containsdent's budget 300 billion in savings. it is silly to think the president will negotiate with himself on entitlements. we done that would not happen. we are waiting for specifics somewhere from republican colleagues to show they're serious on negotiations. >> three weeks ago people sent a message, democrats to our set candidates and built campaigns are run the idea of budgets have to work for middle-class. republican campaigns were clear, too. their commitment to protecting the rich, the ryan but it was on the ballot and it was rejected. the american people voted for candidates who committed to fighting for the middle-class. it was clear they agreed with democrats the what they have to participate and pay the fair share. it is finally encouraging to hear republicans are too soft and rhetoric when it comes to crashes on the rich. i am hopeful the to the a lesso
a single idea short of vouchering medicare that we all know is off the table. even mitt romney denied that one as the campaign went on. if republicans insist on spending cuts the on news is on them to come forward with some ideas t. president's budget continues over $300 billion in health savings. if they don't like that they should make a counter offer. we know that won't happen. we are waiting for some specific somewhere from our republican colleagues to show that they are serious on negotiations. >> three weeks ago the american people went to the polling places and they sent a message. democrats from president obama to our senate candidates on down built their campaigns around the idea that budgets have to work for our middle class and that the wealthy need to pay their fair share. republicans were clear too their to protect the wealthny and it was rejected. the american people voted for the candidates who committed to fighting for the middle class and in exit polls they agree that the wealthy have to participate and pay their fair share. here we are at the end of the year and it's
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